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Blood Donation Refused

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I read somewhere that if you are a blood donar and go to the Caribbean you are refused the right to give blood for 1 year because they claim you were exposed to marlaria in the Carribbean. I will be going to the Bahamas in April of next year and wonder if I will be prevented from donating blood in this country because of a vacation choice?

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It might... but check out the attached link from the American Red Cross to be sure.

http://www.redcross.org/services/biomed/0,...,0_557_,00.html

When I clicked on "malaria," the following info came up (I added the bolding):

In-Depth Discussion of Malaria and Blood Donation

Malaria is a blood infection caused by a parasite that can be transmitted from a donor to a patient through transfusion. It is possible to have a new infection with malaria but have no symptoms, even though the parasite is present in your blood. It is also possible to feel well, but have a very mild case of malaria, especially if you have lived for extended periods of time in parts of the world where malaria is found.

The Centers for Disease Control and Protection keep track of the locations with malaria for international travelers from the United States, and this information is available on their web site at http://www.cdc.gov. There is risk of malaria in some parts of Mexico. In the Caribbean, malaria is found only in Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

The countries that have NO malaria risk in any area are as follows, listed alphabetically:

Albania, Andorra, Anguilla, Antigua/Barbuda, Aruba, Australia, Austria, Azores, Bahamas, Bahrain, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Bermuda, Boznia/Herzegovina, Brunei, Bulgaria, Canada, Canary Islands, Cayman Islands, Chile, Christmas Island, Cook Islands, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Diego Garcia Islands, Dominica, England, Estonia, Falkland Islands, Faroe Islands, Fiji, Finland, France, French Polynesia, Germany, Gibraltar, Greece, Greenland, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guam, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Northern and Republic of), Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kiribati, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Madeira, Maldives, Malta, Marshall Islands, Martinique, Micronesia, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montserrat, Nauru, Netherlands, Netherland Antilles, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Niue, Northern Mariana Islands, Norway, Pacific Islands, Palau, Pitcairn Islands, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Reunion, Romania, Russia, Saint Helena, Saint Kitts, Saint Lucia, Saint Pierre, Saint Vincent, Samoa, San Marino, Scotland, Seychelles, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tokelau, Tonga, Trinidad/Tobago, Tunisia, Turks/Caicos Islands, Tuvalu, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Virgin Islands, Wake Island, and Yugoslavia.

Blood donations are not tested for malaria. Therefore, it is important that people who may have malaria or been exposed to malaria because of living in, or traveling to, a country where malaria is present not be allowed to donate blood until enough time has passed to be certain that they are not infected with malaria. This is done by having a waiting period for those who lived in, move from, or traveled to, the locations with malaria.

If you have traveled outside of the United States, your travel destinations will be reviewed to see if you were in a malaria-risk area. It would be most helpful if you came prepared to report the country and city or destinations to which you traveled, as well as the travel dates.

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