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    Man-overboard system aboard cruise ships. Your thoughts?


    A US based specialist cruise lawyer says that although there have been 8 congressional hearings in the House and the Senate since December 2005 regarding issues of cruise passenger safety, cruise companies in the US continue to ignore the legal requirement to have man-overboard systems.

    With one of the most talked about problems has been the issue of passengers going over-board from cruise ships, Jim Walker of Walker & O'Neill Maritime Lawyers says that there has been ongoing discussion about the problem and the necessity of requiring the cruise industry to install systems to detect when people go overboard from cruise ships.

    The International Cruise Victims (ICV) organization has been responsible for bringing this issue to the public's attention, with the CEO of the ICV, Ken Carver, losing his daughter, Merrian Carver, under suspicious circumstances from the Mercury cruise ship operated by Royal Caribbean Cruises' subsidiary, Celebrity Cruises.

    Although the cabin steward knew that Ms. Carver was no longer in her cabin early on during the cruise, his supervisor instructed him to do nothing about it.

    The cruise line never reported the incident to the Alaska State Troopers, or the FBI, or the flag state. Celebrity then discarded the majority of Ms. Carver's clothes and personal effects. You can read about the disturbing story here.

    Mr. Carver attended the first Congressional hearing in 2005 which was convened following the disappearance of George Smith during a honeymoon cruise aboard Royal Caribbean's Brilliance of the Seas and by all accounts, other passengers probably threw Mr. Smith over the railing of his cabin, but there have been no arrests over the last 8 years.

    Mr Walker says that the cases of both Ms. Carver and Mr. Smith remain "mysteries."

    Mr. Carver and the Smith family founded the ICV because their children disappeared at sea under suspicious circumstances with the cruise lines being uncooperative.

    Subsequent Congressional hearings have focused on the disappearance of other cruise passengers and although the cruise industry claims that it does not track man over-board cases, cruise expert Dr. Ross Klein has a list of over 200 people who have gone overboard from cruise ships since 2000, with in addition, crew members in addition to passenger have disappeared from cruise ships.

    Royal Caribbean and its subsidiary Celebrity are reported to have experienced 11 people going overboard since October 2010.

    In 2010, after years of opposition by the cruise industry, Congress passed the Cruise Vessel Safety and Security Act to address the issue of properly detecting persons who go overboard, with the Act requiring that ‘‘the vessel shall integrate technology that can be used for capturing images of passengers or detecting passengers who have fallen overboard, to the extent that such technology is available.’’

    Three years later, it appears that few cruise ships have been fitted with the required technology, while cruise passengers and even a larger number of crew members have continued to disappear from cruise ships without explanation.

    Mr Walker says that there is no question that the technology exists to detect when a person goes overboard which will immediately signal to the bridge, capturing an image of the person going overboard, and record the exact location.

    Instead of installing these systems, he says most cruise line are still having to review hours and hours of CCTV images after a report of a man overboard is made to try and figure out when and why a person went overboard.

    In the case of cruise passenger Jason Rappe who went overboard from Holland America Line (HAL) Eurodam cruise vessel last year, HAL did not install the required man overboard system even though several cruise passengers recently disappeared on HAL ships.

    The delay in determining when a person goes overboard increases the area which the Coast Guard is required to search by air and sea and reduces the chances of locating and rescuing the person overboard.

    It also substantially increases the expenses borne by taxpayers, with the US Coast Guard expenses in the Jason Rappe search efforts by the US Coast Guard totalling almost $1,000,000.

    Mr Walker also says that another problem also exists, in that if a person can go overboard undetected, then people can just as easily come onto a cruise ship undetected – like terrorists, pirates or criminals.

    Last year, Congress commented on the cruise industry's lack of progress in implementing the requires man overboard systems, with Congress commenting, "The degree to which the cruise industry has complied with this requirement is entirely unclear.” “There may be additional camera surveillance (but no indication that this is the case), however there has not been adoption of any of the active measures recommended by the International Cruise Victims Association in discussions with the industry prior to the legislation being passed.”

    “There are many systems available, many manufactured and marketed in the US, but none of these appear to be under consideration for adoption, no doubt because of the cost involved."

    In addition, the the US Coast Guard posted a Federal Register Request for Input from the maritime security Industry, and received a number of proposals, but there is no indication that these have been acted upon.

    Proposals were received from Seafaring Security Systems and Radio Zealand DMP Americas, along with supporting documentation which was posted on the US Coast Guard website.

    Mr Waler says he has found only one cruise line which has agreed to install a state of the art man overboard on some of its ships, with Norwegian Cruise Line (NCL) recently agreeing to install a system by Seafaring Security Systems on two of its newest ships which are being built.

    The Varuna Man Overboard System," or V-MOB, is described as a "revolutionary system designed to enhance safety, security and situational awareness aboard ships." Here's the company's description of the product, with a unique integration of advanced cameras, sensors and a customized graphic interface that automates surveillance and detection around the ship’s perimeter, alerting the crew to anomalies such as man-overboard, fires, and unauthorized boarding.

    When an overboard incident occurs, the V-MOB sensors detect it, GPS coordinates to the overboard site are recorded, and designated personnel are alerted via specific alarms. The V-MOB significantly enhances the opportunity for rapid rescue of overboard personnel.

    The V-MOB system detects the presence of fire sooner than contemporary fire detection systems (recent testing provided alarms two minutes before existing fire detection systems) commonly found on ships, thereby maximizing fire suppression and extinguishing efforts.

    The V-MOB system also detects unauthorized attempts to board from deck railing, alerting security personnel onboard the ship to provide critical response time to meet and deal with the threat in a timely manner.

    If the news is correct, Mr Waler says that NCL should be applauded for being a leader in implementing the new man overboard technology. It's a shame none of the other cruise lines appear to have done so.

    By John Alwyn-Jones, Editor and Correspondent (ETB News: JAJ)

    For more cruise news & articles go to http://www.cruisecrazies.com/index.html

    Re-posted on CruiseCrazies.com - Cruise News, Articles, Forums, Packing List, Ship Tracker, and more

    http://www.cruisecrazies.com

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    From the article:

    "In the case of cruise passenger Jason Rappe who went overboard from Holland America Line (HAL) Eurodam cruise vessel last year, HAL did not install the required man overboard system even though several cruise passengers recently disappeared on HAL ships."

    'Required'? Required by whom? For the life of me I don't recall any maritime law or Coast Guard regulations that REQUIRE one of the discussed man overboard systems to be installed on any vessel.

    Everyone here is an experienced cruiser. I'm more than sure that everyone here knows how high the rails are both on the open decks and on the balconies. You don't 'fall' overboard. There must be a level of intent there... or remarkable stupidity.

    Given the height above the water that open decks and balcony cabins are at the fall itself is likely to be either incapacitating or fatal. No matter how rapidly the man overboard is reported chances of recovery are very slim. Sure, we've heard of a few folks who have gone overboard and been recovered but it's certainly not the norm.

    Please don't get me wrong... I'd love to never see another man overboard report but there have to be some practical limits in efforts to prevent people from doing flat stupid things. No matter what kind of system is installed people who want to jump off the ship will jump off the ship. After this they'll be asking that the entire ship be encapsulated by a net!!!

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    Thanks for the article and info. I will be interested to see what is to come of this in the future.

    It would also be interesting (if it could ever be known) to break up those man overboard statistics.. Into actual accident (stupidity) and/or violence to those that went overboard if their own will.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk - http://tapatalk.com/m/'>now Free

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    Thanks for the article and info. I will be interested to see what is to come of this in the future.

    It would also be interesting (if it could ever be known) to break up those man overboard statistics.. Into actual accident (stupidity) and/or violence to those that went overboard if their own will.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk - now Free

    Exactly right. As I said in my post, we all know that it's virtually impossible to just fall off the ship. I've heard a report of a guy who was trying to get from one balcony to another by going around the outside of the divider standing on the balcony rail (stupidity...) and another report of an elderly gent who left a suicide note in his cabin.

    We can't prevent risk completely no matter how hard we try. Everything in life has an element of risk, end of story. I get so tired of people trying to plan for the least common denominator. I've got a ladder with SIX warning labels on it! I've flown jets with fewer warnings than that!!!

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