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  1. Last week
  2. CNN) — Florida's new law prohibiting businesses from asking whether employees or customers have been vaccinated against Covid-19 may take a toll on its cruise business. The CEO of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd. said Thursday it could cause the company to suspend Florida departures and move its ships elsewhere. "At the end of the day, cruise ships have motors, propellers and rudders, and God forbid we can't operate in the state of Florida for whatever reason, then there are other states that we do operate from, and we can operate from the Caribbean for a ship that otherwise would have gone to Florida," CEO Frank Del Rio said during the company's quarterly earnings call. Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed an executive order last month banning the use of Covid-19 passports in the state. The order prohibited any government entity from issuing vaccine passports and blocks businesses from requiring any such documentation. Senate Bill 2006 was signed into law Monday making that executive order official. "In Florida, your personal choice regarding vaccinations will be protected and no business or government entity will be able to deny you services based on your decision," DeSantis said. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week announced guidelines for trial cruises with volunteer passengers to test safety measures, which will be required for each ship before resuming regular passenger voyages in US waters. To bypass the trial cruises, the CDC says at least 98% of crew members and 95% of passengers must have been vaccinated. Del Rio says he hopes the CDC's conditions will override the governor's action when it comes to the cruise industry, although he said he was "disappointed at first read" of the agency's proposal for resuming cruise operations. "It is a classic state versus federal government issue," said Del Rio. "Lawyers believe that federal law applies." He added that the company has been in talks with the governor's office but did not specify what was discussed. Norwegian Cruise Line had previously hoped to resume cruises on July 4, and said it was willing to require all passengers and staff to be vaccinated in order to gain CDC approval. That's no longer possible, Del Rio said Thursday. "It was possible back in early April when we proposed to the CDC 100% vaccination. We've always said it takes about 90 days to stand up a vessel," he said. So the cruise line is now looking at August at the earliest. Whether Norwegian decides to operate in Florida or not, it and other cruise companies will have to meet the CDC requirements before setting sail from US ports. DeSantis had earlier cited freedom and privacy concerns as the primary basis for his executive order, arguing that the implementation and enforcement of vaccine passports would "create two classes of citizens based on vaccinations." His order had noted that many Floridians have not yet had the opportunity to obtain a vaccine, while some may have infection-acquired immunity, and other people may be unable to get a Covid-19 vaccine because of health, religious or other reasons. "Individual Covid-19 vaccination records are private health information and should not be shared by a mandate," DeSantis' executive order had read. But, Del Rio's company plans to stick to vaccination requirements. "At least in the beginning, 100% of our guests and our crew will be vaccinated," Del Rio said. "I think everyone should be wanting to start cruising in the safest possible manner." Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd. operates three cruise lines: Norwegian Cruise Line, Oceania Cruises and Regent Seven Seas Cruises. Representatives for the company and DeSantis did not immediately return messages from CNN for comment on Thursday night. Correction: A previous version of this story mischaracterized CDC requirements for cruise ship passenger and crew vaccination. __________________________ SOURCE: CNN (Mallika Kallingal and Andy Rose, CNN • Updated 7th May 2021); Photo Credit: Norwegian Cruise Line Re-posted on CruiseCrazies.com - Cruise News, Articles, Forums, Packing List, Ship Tracker, and more For more cruise news and articles go to CruiseCrazies.com View full article
  3. CNN) — Florida's new law prohibiting businesses from asking whether employees or customers have been vaccinated against Covid-19 may take a toll on its cruise business. The CEO of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd. said Thursday it could cause the company to suspend Florida departures and move its ships elsewhere. "At the end of the day, cruise ships have motors, propellers and rudders, and God forbid we can't operate in the state of Florida for whatever reason, then there are other states that we do operate from, and we can operate from the Caribbean for a ship that otherwise would have gone to Florida," CEO Frank Del Rio said during the company's quarterly earnings call. Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed an executive order last month banning the use of Covid-19 passports in the state. The order prohibited any government entity from issuing vaccine passports and blocks businesses from requiring any such documentation. Senate Bill 2006 was signed into law Monday making that executive order official. "In Florida, your personal choice regarding vaccinations will be protected and no business or government entity will be able to deny you services based on your decision," DeSantis said. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week announced guidelines for trial cruises with volunteer passengers to test safety measures, which will be required for each ship before resuming regular passenger voyages in US waters. To bypass the trial cruises, the CDC says at least 98% of crew members and 95% of passengers must have been vaccinated. Del Rio says he hopes the CDC's conditions will override the governor's action when it comes to the cruise industry, although he said he was "disappointed at first read" of the agency's proposal for resuming cruise operations. "It is a classic state versus federal government issue," said Del Rio. "Lawyers believe that federal law applies." He added that the company has been in talks with the governor's office but did not specify what was discussed. Norwegian Cruise Line had previously hoped to resume cruises on July 4, and said it was willing to require all passengers and staff to be vaccinated in order to gain CDC approval. That's no longer possible, Del Rio said Thursday. "It was possible back in early April when we proposed to the CDC 100% vaccination. We've always said it takes about 90 days to stand up a vessel," he said. So the cruise line is now looking at August at the earliest. Whether Norwegian decides to operate in Florida or not, it and other cruise companies will have to meet the CDC requirements before setting sail from US ports. DeSantis had earlier cited freedom and privacy concerns as the primary basis for his executive order, arguing that the implementation and enforcement of vaccine passports would "create two classes of citizens based on vaccinations." His order had noted that many Floridians have not yet had the opportunity to obtain a vaccine, while some may have infection-acquired immunity, and other people may be unable to get a Covid-19 vaccine because of health, religious or other reasons. "Individual Covid-19 vaccination records are private health information and should not be shared by a mandate," DeSantis' executive order had read. But, Del Rio's company plans to stick to vaccination requirements. "At least in the beginning, 100% of our guests and our crew will be vaccinated," Del Rio said. "I think everyone should be wanting to start cruising in the safest possible manner." Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd. operates three cruise lines: Norwegian Cruise Line, Oceania Cruises and Regent Seven Seas Cruises. Representatives for the company and DeSantis did not immediately return messages from CNN for comment on Thursday night. Correction: A previous version of this story mischaracterized CDC requirements for cruise ship passenger and crew vaccination. __________________________ SOURCE: CNN (Mallika Kallingal and Andy Rose, CNN • Updated 7th May 2021); Photo Credit: Norwegian Cruise Line Re-posted on CruiseCrazies.com - Cruise News, Articles, Forums, Packing List, Ship Tracker, and more For more cruise news and articles go to CruiseCrazies.com
  4. Princess has a new dining program “Dine My Way” linked to the Medallion. I like the concept. What do you think? https://www.princess.com/ships-and-experience/food-and-dining/dine-my-way/?fbclid=IwAR1jGfh5CXm2IunzGvWZrM5g45G_b-aL53MzNgYy48hZ1hrPy3kNRMPAcmg
  5. I'm greatly anticipating my very first cruise (May 2022.) I am booked and ready to go ! It was always meant to be , because I have lots of nautical(anchors& pictures of ships) pieces around the house, that of which I love . Wow, you certainly know a thing or two about cruising - which is awesome ! Wishing you a positive recovery and keep up the good work 🙂 I appreciate your welcome, and its a pleasure to be here.
  6. It appears the restart of U.S. cruising is now on a bit clearer path. Late Wednesday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released more guidance for cruise ships undertaking simulated voyages with volunteer passengers as part of the COVID-19 Conditional Sailing Certificate application. "With the issuance of these documents, cruise ship operators now have all the necessary requirements and recommendations they need to start simulated voyages before resuming restricted passenger voyages," the CDC said in a press release. The cruise lines can avoid those simulated voyages entirely if 98 percent of passengers and 95 percent of crew have received the full COVID-19 vaccination at least 14 days prior to embarkation. And, for the first time, the CDC released its COVID-19 Conditional Sailing Certificate application, which the agency called "the final step before cruises can restart as 'restricted passenger voyages.'" Initial Industry Reaction On Wednesday night, Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) said it was reviewing the new details provided by the CDC, as did Carnival Corporation, the world's biggest cruise company. "The technical instructions issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on May 5 confirm that there is a lot of work to do in order to achieve the goal of sailing from U.S. ports this summer," a spokesperson for CLIA told Travel Agent. "We appreciate the CDC’s expressed commitment to this goal and look forward to further discussions on the details of the instruction, including a better understanding of how predominantly vaccinated passengers and crew can accelerate a return to service. Meanwhile, nearly half a million American jobs and livelihoods continue to hang in the balance. The cruise industry will continue to go above and beyond to meet the requirements of the CDC, building on the ongoing resumption of operations taking place in other parts of the world and the demonstrated success of the industry’s protocols and public health measures." Other travel industry sources told Travel Agent that the CDC action is a positive step, but some also point out that the cruise industry is still being treated differently than other sectors such as hospitality and airlines. "I am happy to see any progress, especially on National Travel Advisors Day, but at the same time, it’s complex and frankly still unbalanced versus the guidance the CDC has provided other businesses and even Americans in general," says Alex Sharpe, president and CEO of Signature Travel Network. "Lots of work still to do." CDC Background In Wednesday's press release, the CDC said it released the "Conditional Sail" Order (CSO) in October 2020 "to prevent the further spread of COVID-19 on cruise ships, from cruise ships into communities, and to protect public health and safety." The order introduced a phased approach for the resumption of passenger cruises to mitigate the risk of spreading COVID-19 onboard. But the order was seriously lacking in the type of detail the cruise industry said it needed to plan a restart. The latest guidance from the CDC provided technical instructions for simulated voyages, including: Eligibility and requirements for conducting a simulated (trial) voyage in preparation for restricted passenger voyages Guidance for inspections of cruise ships conducted by CDC during simulated and restricted passenger voyages Operational procedures to assist cruise ship operators in mitigating the risk of spreading COVID-19, including requirements and recommendations on prevention measures, surveillance for COVID-19 on board, laboratory testing, infection prevention and control, face mask use, social distancing, passenger interactive experiences, and embarkation and disembarkation procedures In the final phase of the CSO, cruise ships operators with an approved COVID-19 Conditional Sailing Certificate application will be permitted to sail with passengers following the requirements of the CSO. The CDC said it doesn't anticipate releasing any additional documents for the next phase. Instead, it will update online documents to incorporate changes to quarantine, testing, color status and lessons learned from simulated voyages. The agency's press release also said it's "committed to working with the cruise industry and seaport partners to resume cruising following the phased approach outlined in the CSO. This goal aligns with the prospective resumption of passenger operations in the United States by mid-summer, expressed by many major cruise ship operators and travelers." Adding a bit of background: The CDC said that since April 12, 2021, it (as well as senior leadership from other federal agencies) had engaged in twice-weekly meetings with cruise line representatives for dialogue and the exchange of information. Addressing the vaccine issue, the CDC's press release said that "COVD-19 vaccines play a critical role in the safe resumption of passenger operations, but not all cruise ship operators have announced plans to mandate passenger vaccinations." But as more people are fully vaccinated and more drug therapeutics are available, the CDC said that a phased approach will allow incorporation of these advancements into planning for safe resumption of cruise ship travel. The CDC recommends that all port personnel and travelers (passengers and crew) get a COVID-19 vaccine when a vaccine is available to them. The CDC also acknowledged that "it is not possible for cruising to be a zero-risk activity for spread of COVID-19. While cruising will always pose some risk of COVID-19 transmission, CDC is committed to ensuring that cruise ship passenger operations are conducted in a way that protects crew members, passengers, and port personnel, particularly with emerging COVID-19 variants of concern." For the CDC's views of COVID-19 and cruise ships, visit www.cdc.gov/coronavirusand www.cdc.gov/quarantine/cruise. __________________________ SOURCE: Travel Agent Central (Susan Young, May 5, 2021); Photo Credit: Pixabay Free Images Re-posted on CruiseCrazies.com - Cruise News, Articles, Forums, Packing List, Ship Tracker, and more For more cruise news and articles go to CruiseCrazies.com
  7. It appears the restart of U.S. cruising is now on a bit clearer path. Late Wednesday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released more guidance for cruise ships undertaking simulated voyages with volunteer passengers as part of the COVID-19 Conditional Sailing Certificate application. "With the issuance of these documents, cruise ship operators now have all the necessary requirements and recommendations they need to start simulated voyages before resuming restricted passenger voyages," the CDC said in a press release. The cruise lines can avoid those simulated voyages entirely if 98 percent of passengers and 95 percent of crew have received the full COVID-19 vaccination at least 14 days prior to embarkation. And, for the first time, the CDC released its COVID-19 Conditional Sailing Certificate application, which the agency called "the final step before cruises can restart as 'restricted passenger voyages.'" Initial Industry Reaction On Wednesday night, Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) said it was reviewing the new details provided by the CDC, as did Carnival Corporation, the world's biggest cruise company. "The technical instructions issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on May 5 confirm that there is a lot of work to do in order to achieve the goal of sailing from U.S. ports this summer," a spokesperson for CLIA told Travel Agent. "We appreciate the CDC’s expressed commitment to this goal and look forward to further discussions on the details of the instruction, including a better understanding of how predominantly vaccinated passengers and crew can accelerate a return to service. Meanwhile, nearly half a million American jobs and livelihoods continue to hang in the balance. The cruise industry will continue to go above and beyond to meet the requirements of the CDC, building on the ongoing resumption of operations taking place in other parts of the world and the demonstrated success of the industry’s protocols and public health measures." Other travel industry sources told Travel Agent that the CDC action is a positive step, but some also point out that the cruise industry is still being treated differently than other sectors such as hospitality and airlines. "I am happy to see any progress, especially on National Travel Advisors Day, but at the same time, it’s complex and frankly still unbalanced versus the guidance the CDC has provided other businesses and even Americans in general," says Alex Sharpe, president and CEO of Signature Travel Network. "Lots of work still to do." CDC Background In Wednesday's press release, the CDC said it released the "Conditional Sail" Order (CSO) in October 2020 "to prevent the further spread of COVID-19 on cruise ships, from cruise ships into communities, and to protect public health and safety." The order introduced a phased approach for the resumption of passenger cruises to mitigate the risk of spreading COVID-19 onboard. But the order was seriously lacking in the type of detail the cruise industry said it needed to plan a restart. The latest guidance from the CDC provided technical instructions for simulated voyages, including: Eligibility and requirements for conducting a simulated (trial) voyage in preparation for restricted passenger voyages Guidance for inspections of cruise ships conducted by CDC during simulated and restricted passenger voyages Operational procedures to assist cruise ship operators in mitigating the risk of spreading COVID-19, including requirements and recommendations on prevention measures, surveillance for COVID-19 on board, laboratory testing, infection prevention and control, face mask use, social distancing, passenger interactive experiences, and embarkation and disembarkation procedures In the final phase of the CSO, cruise ships operators with an approved COVID-19 Conditional Sailing Certificate application will be permitted to sail with passengers following the requirements of the CSO. The CDC said it doesn't anticipate releasing any additional documents for the next phase. Instead, it will update online documents to incorporate changes to quarantine, testing, color status and lessons learned from simulated voyages. The agency's press release also said it's "committed to working with the cruise industry and seaport partners to resume cruising following the phased approach outlined in the CSO. This goal aligns with the prospective resumption of passenger operations in the United States by mid-summer, expressed by many major cruise ship operators and travelers." Adding a bit of background: The CDC said that since April 12, 2021, it (as well as senior leadership from other federal agencies) had engaged in twice-weekly meetings with cruise line representatives for dialogue and the exchange of information. Addressing the vaccine issue, the CDC's press release said that "COVD-19 vaccines play a critical role in the safe resumption of passenger operations, but not all cruise ship operators have announced plans to mandate passenger vaccinations." But as more people are fully vaccinated and more drug therapeutics are available, the CDC said that a phased approach will allow incorporation of these advancements into planning for safe resumption of cruise ship travel. The CDC recommends that all port personnel and travelers (passengers and crew) get a COVID-19 vaccine when a vaccine is available to them. The CDC also acknowledged that "it is not possible for cruising to be a zero-risk activity for spread of COVID-19. While cruising will always pose some risk of COVID-19 transmission, CDC is committed to ensuring that cruise ship passenger operations are conducted in a way that protects crew members, passengers, and port personnel, particularly with emerging COVID-19 variants of concern." For the CDC's views of COVID-19 and cruise ships, visit www.cdc.gov/coronavirusand www.cdc.gov/quarantine/cruise. __________________________ SOURCE: Travel Agent Central (Susan Young, May 5, 2021); Photo Credit: Pixabay Free Images Re-posted on CruiseCrazies.com - Cruise News, Articles, Forums, Packing List, Ship Tracker, and more For more cruise news and articles go to CruiseCrazies.com View full article
  8. I had a stroke. I'm able to talk to little bit. But I keep trying. Welcome...I'm glad to have you here. I've been on 10 cruises.
  9. Now that the future is looking brighter for cruising, people will likely start venturing on board ships again. I am thinking optimistically and have five cruises in the pipeline scheduled through 2022, making up for lost time. I have added them to our Roll Call Forum. Feel free to add your cruises, as well. Someone here in the community could be on the same sailing, and you can discuss your plans and anticipate the excitement together! Cruise Roll Call Forum
  10. Just booked this one, which will be our first time cruising from San Juan. The ship is not my favorite in the fleet, but I love the itinerary! Anyone else?
  11. This is an itinerary canceled in March 2022 at the start of the pandemic, and decided to give it another shot, this time on Princess (instead of Norwegian as booked previously). It will be our first time cruising out of L.A. and we are looking forward to another beautiful ship! It’s also our first time cruising over Thanksgiving. The family will have to roast their own turkey this year! Anyone else on board?
  12. For our return to cruising in nearly 2 years, we chose Royal Caribbean’s 7-night round-trip from Bermuda. This is one of RCI’s restart itineraries from foreign ports, as US ports were not yet open at the time we booked this. Looking forward to our aft-facing balcony and 4 sea days to enjoy it!😀
  13. Norwegian Cruise Line will not require passengers to book shore excursions through the ship when it resumes sailings this summer, a company executive said in an interview this week. "From our first voyage out of the gate, you are free to tour on your own in every port," Norwegian's chief sales officer, Katina Athanasiou, said on Travel Weekly'spodcast. "We anticipated needing to do this shore excursion bubble for the first month of operations. We've already lifted that, because in working with our ports and the authorities and each of the local governments, they now anticipate their vaccination increase to be enough that their local communities are going to be supported, and we no longer have to do a shore excursion bubble. So guests will be free to tour on their own." The news comes weeks after the cruise line announced it'll only allow vaccinated passengers and crew to board its ships. Norwegian, which has one of the strictest vaccination mandates of cruise linesresuming operations, plans to sail to the Greek islands in July, followed by trips from Montego Bay, Jamaica, and Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. In September, Norwegian expects to set sail from Barcelona and Italy. The cruise line plans to require the jab for all passengers and crew for sailings through at least October 31. The concept of a cruise bubble with controlled shore excursions became popular in Europe last summer as some ships attempted to restart cruising safely. In August 2020, one family was even denied boarding an MSC Cruises ship after they separated from their group during an officially planned excursion. While several cruise lines are homeporting in countries around the world this summer, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said it is "committed" to resuming cruises in the United States by the summer. _______________________________ SOURCE: Travel and Leisure (Alison Fox, May 4, 2021); Photo Credit: Norwegian Cruise Line Re-posted on CruiseCrazies.com - Cruise News, Articles, Forums, Packing List, Ship Tracker, and more For more cruise news and articles go to CruiseCrazies.com View full article
  14. Norwegian Cruise Line will not require passengers to book shore excursions through the ship when it resumes sailings this summer, a company executive said in an interview this week. "From our first voyage out of the gate, you are free to tour on your own in every port," Norwegian's chief sales officer, Katina Athanasiou, said on Travel Weekly'spodcast. "We anticipated needing to do this shore excursion bubble for the first month of operations. We've already lifted that, because in working with our ports and the authorities and each of the local governments, they now anticipate their vaccination increase to be enough that their local communities are going to be supported, and we no longer have to do a shore excursion bubble. So guests will be free to tour on their own." The news comes weeks after the cruise line announced it'll only allow vaccinated passengers and crew to board its ships. Norwegian, which has one of the strictest vaccination mandates of cruise linesresuming operations, plans to sail to the Greek islands in July, followed by trips from Montego Bay, Jamaica, and Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. In September, Norwegian expects to set sail from Barcelona and Italy. The cruise line plans to require the jab for all passengers and crew for sailings through at least October 31. The concept of a cruise bubble with controlled shore excursions became popular in Europe last summer as some ships attempted to restart cruising safely. In August 2020, one family was even denied boarding an MSC Cruises ship after they separated from their group during an officially planned excursion. While several cruise lines are homeporting in countries around the world this summer, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said it is "committed" to resuming cruises in the United States by the summer. _______________________________ SOURCE: Travel and Leisure (Alison Fox, May 4, 2021); Photo Credit: Norwegian Cruise Line Re-posted on CruiseCrazies.com - Cruise News, Articles, Forums, Packing List, Ship Tracker, and more For more cruise news and articles go to CruiseCrazies.com
  15. Seattle, Wash., May 5, 2021 — Working in close coordination with the government of Greece, Holland America Line has received approval to restart cruising from Piraeus (Athens) in August with four departures aboard Eurodam. Bookings for these cruises will open May 6. Departing Aug. 15 and 29, the “Idyllic Greek Isles” itinerary features Kotor, Montenegro, plus the Greek isles of Kékira (Corfu), Thíra (Santorini) and Mykonos. “Ancient Wonders” departs Aug. 22 to explore Haifa, Israel, as well as Náfplion, Mykonos and Rhodes in Greece. Both options can be combined to form a longer, back-to-back 14-day Collectors’ Voyage. A seven-day “Adriatic Allure” itinerary departing Sept. 5 will sail from Piraeus to Venice, Italy, with calls at Mykonos, Katakolon (Olympia) and Crete (Chania), Greece, and Sarandë, Albania. Additional Mediterranean cruises aboard Eurodam through the fall will be announced in the coming weeks and include ports in Italy and Greece. Eurodam returns to the United States to begin sailing its published Caribbean cruises in mid-November. “Everyone at Holland America Line has been preparing for our return to service, and we are grateful to the government of Greece for allowing us to show that we can safely operate our cruises,” said Gus Antorcha, president of Holland America Line. “The beautiful islands of Greece have been a highlight of our Mediterranean itineraries for decades, and we are honored to be able to restart out of Athens and give our guests a memorable vacation after all this time without cruise travel.” “The Greek Islands have been welcoming Holland America Line ships for many years, and we are proud to work together to welcome the cruise line back this summer,” said Harry Theoharis, Minister of Tourism of Greece. “We are sure that all visitors to Greece will once again have unique experiences to our beautiful destinations and fully enjoy the rich history, culture and gastronomy of our nation.'' On board, Holland America Line will continue to offer the amenities that are a hallmark of the brand. Dining will be available in all restaurants and specialty venues, as well as room service. Entertainment will be in full swing in the main show lounge, and live music will be featured in Lincoln Center Stage, B.B. King’s Blues Club, Billboard Onboard and Rolling Stone Rock Room. Port-to-Table culinary demonstrations, EXC Talks and more will bring Greece and its culture on board through engaging activities. To accommodate physical distancing, additional performances may be added to the schedule. Cruise and Stay Healthy with ‘Travel Well’ Protocols Holland America Line cruises from Greece are available for guests who have received their final dose of an approved COVID-19 vaccine at least 14 days prior to the beginning of the cruise and have proof of vaccination. Holland America Line guests will be required to comply with all health and safety protocols in place at the time of departure for travel to and from the ship, as well as all onboard protocols and procedures for visiting ports. Guests can find information about Greece traveler health requirements on the Visit Greece website. Additional preventive health measures under Holland America Line’s “Travel Well” program will be in place, including health screenings, face mask requirements, physical distancing and capacity controls. The ships now feature enhanced environmental sanitation and air filtration with upgraded HVAC systems and ultraviolet technology. HEPA filters will be used in key areas as a further safeguard. In addition, medical centers will be equipped with COVID-19 testing and treatment capabilities. Holland America Line’s protocols are subject to change as work continues in collaboration with medical experts and government bodies to ensure the practices evolve in line with the latest advice. Full details, including cruise fares and information on shore excursions, are being finalized and will be shared in the coming weeks at hollandamerica.com. Attractive airfares from several domestic and international gateways will be available through Holland America Line’s FlightEase program. Flexible cancellation terms, including our Covid-19 Protections, are offered through “Book with Confidence” when booked by June 30, 2021, for sailings through Dec. 31, 2021. The cruise line’s Cancellation Protection Plan also allows cancellation up to 24 hours in advance. To accommodate the new Greece sailings, guests sailing on Eurodam’s published Seattle roundtrip Alaska cruises will be moved to similar accommodations on sister ship Nieuw Amsterdam, which is scheduled to sail on the same departure dates. In addition, European cruises departing from July 1 through July 25 on Volendam and July 1 through Aug. 31 on Westerdam will be canceled. Guests who were booked on impacted cruises and their travel advisors are being notified. Fares for Eurodam's seven-day Greece cruises begin at a “Have it All” premium package fare of $1,999 per person that includes one shore excursion, a beverage package, specialty dining and Wi-Fi. Cruise-only fares start at $1,649 per person, double occupancy. Taxes, fees and port expenses are additional. _________________________ SOURCE: Holland America (Press Release, May 5, 2021); Photo Credit: Holland America Re-posted on CruiseCrazies.com - Cruise News, Articles, Forums, Packing List, Ship Tracker, and more For more cruise news and articles go to CruiseCrazies.com View full article
  16. Seattle, Wash., May 5, 2021 — Working in close coordination with the government of Greece, Holland America Line has received approval to restart cruising from Piraeus (Athens) in August with four departures aboard Eurodam. Bookings for these cruises will open May 6. Departing Aug. 15 and 29, the “Idyllic Greek Isles” itinerary features Kotor, Montenegro, plus the Greek isles of Kékira (Corfu), Thíra (Santorini) and Mykonos. “Ancient Wonders” departs Aug. 22 to explore Haifa, Israel, as well as Náfplion, Mykonos and Rhodes in Greece. Both options can be combined to form a longer, back-to-back 14-day Collectors’ Voyage. A seven-day “Adriatic Allure” itinerary departing Sept. 5 will sail from Piraeus to Venice, Italy, with calls at Mykonos, Katakolon (Olympia) and Crete (Chania), Greece, and Sarandë, Albania. Additional Mediterranean cruises aboard Eurodam through the fall will be announced in the coming weeks and include ports in Italy and Greece. Eurodam returns to the United States to begin sailing its published Caribbean cruises in mid-November. “Everyone at Holland America Line has been preparing for our return to service, and we are grateful to the government of Greece for allowing us to show that we can safely operate our cruises,” said Gus Antorcha, president of Holland America Line. “The beautiful islands of Greece have been a highlight of our Mediterranean itineraries for decades, and we are honored to be able to restart out of Athens and give our guests a memorable vacation after all this time without cruise travel.” “The Greek Islands have been welcoming Holland America Line ships for many years, and we are proud to work together to welcome the cruise line back this summer,” said Harry Theoharis, Minister of Tourism of Greece. “We are sure that all visitors to Greece will once again have unique experiences to our beautiful destinations and fully enjoy the rich history, culture and gastronomy of our nation.'' On board, Holland America Line will continue to offer the amenities that are a hallmark of the brand. Dining will be available in all restaurants and specialty venues, as well as room service. Entertainment will be in full swing in the main show lounge, and live music will be featured in Lincoln Center Stage, B.B. King’s Blues Club, Billboard Onboard and Rolling Stone Rock Room. Port-to-Table culinary demonstrations, EXC Talks and more will bring Greece and its culture on board through engaging activities. To accommodate physical distancing, additional performances may be added to the schedule. Cruise and Stay Healthy with ‘Travel Well’ Protocols Holland America Line cruises from Greece are available for guests who have received their final dose of an approved COVID-19 vaccine at least 14 days prior to the beginning of the cruise and have proof of vaccination. Holland America Line guests will be required to comply with all health and safety protocols in place at the time of departure for travel to and from the ship, as well as all onboard protocols and procedures for visiting ports. Guests can find information about Greece traveler health requirements on the Visit Greece website. Additional preventive health measures under Holland America Line’s “Travel Well” program will be in place, including health screenings, face mask requirements, physical distancing and capacity controls. The ships now feature enhanced environmental sanitation and air filtration with upgraded HVAC systems and ultraviolet technology. HEPA filters will be used in key areas as a further safeguard. In addition, medical centers will be equipped with COVID-19 testing and treatment capabilities. Holland America Line’s protocols are subject to change as work continues in collaboration with medical experts and government bodies to ensure the practices evolve in line with the latest advice. Full details, including cruise fares and information on shore excursions, are being finalized and will be shared in the coming weeks at hollandamerica.com. Attractive airfares from several domestic and international gateways will be available through Holland America Line’s FlightEase program. Flexible cancellation terms, including our Covid-19 Protections, are offered through “Book with Confidence” when booked by June 30, 2021, for sailings through Dec. 31, 2021. The cruise line’s Cancellation Protection Plan also allows cancellation up to 24 hours in advance. To accommodate the new Greece sailings, guests sailing on Eurodam’s published Seattle roundtrip Alaska cruises will be moved to similar accommodations on sister ship Nieuw Amsterdam, which is scheduled to sail on the same departure dates. In addition, European cruises departing from July 1 through July 25 on Volendam and July 1 through Aug. 31 on Westerdam will be canceled. Guests who were booked on impacted cruises and their travel advisors are being notified. Fares for Eurodam's seven-day Greece cruises begin at a “Have it All” premium package fare of $1,999 per person that includes one shore excursion, a beverage package, specialty dining and Wi-Fi. Cruise-only fares start at $1,649 per person, double occupancy. Taxes, fees and port expenses are additional. _________________________ SOURCE: Holland America (Press Release, May 5, 2021); Photo Credit: Holland America Re-posted on CruiseCrazies.com - Cruise News, Articles, Forums, Packing List, Ship Tracker, and more For more cruise news and articles go to CruiseCrazies.com
  17. Earlier
  18. You could be right, Andi, and in the case of guests perhaps they are discounting kids too young for vaccination but allowed to cruise with testing? Just a guess.
  19. Quite possibly since I don't think their Governor is going to nix vaccines. My sister, who lives in Houston, told me that there is a hospital system there that is requiring vaccines for all of their employees by a certain date or they will be terminated.
  20. Unless they are allowing a small percentage for medical contraindications to being vaccinated, but I would think that would only affect about 1% of either population so yes, I think they should both at least be 99% of crew and guests!
  21. I wonder if we will see cruises out of Galveston before those out of Florida.
  22. I totally agree, Andi. And where did the CDC get the 98% for crew and 95% guest mandatory vaccine percentages? Why not 100%?
  23. I loved sailing out of Galveston - and hoping that RCI will put a ship back there again soon as well!
  24. I know that I, at least at the outset, will not cruise unless a vaccine is required, so I would not sail out of a Florida port if they are allowed to bypass that. We need to give the cruises the best possible chance of getting started again without a Covid crisis, otherwise they will end up shut down for who knows how long!
  25. I know, right? It was like a reunion of old friends and made me feel optimistic and hopeful for the future of cruising.😀
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