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Jason

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Jason last won the day on November 26

Jason had the most liked content!

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About Jason

  • Rank
    Member
  • Birthday February 13

Personal Info

  • First Name
    Jason
  • Gender
    Male
  • City
    Fort Lauderdale
  • State
    Florida
  • Country
    United States

Cruising

  • First Cruise Ship
    Carnival Sensation
  • First Cruise Year
    1995
  • Cruises Sailed
    22
  • Favorite Cruise Line
    Carnival
  • Favorite Cruise Ship
    Carnival Victory
  • Favorite Shipboard Activity
    Poolside
  • Favorite Itinerary
    Caribbean
  • Favorite Port of Call
    St. Maarten
  • Favorite Port Activity
    Beach
  • Places I've Cruised To
    Grand Cayman, Ocho Rios, Cozumel, St Maarten, St Croix, St Thomas, Nassau, Freeport, Tortola, Key West, San Juan, Costa Rica, Panama, Coco Cay

Details

  • Hobbies & Interests
    CruiseCrazies, Cruises, Boating, Beach, Hockey, Cooking, Movies, Ice Cream, Baby back ribs and taking advantage of all the outdoor activities available in South Florida
  • Sports
    Hockey
  • Quotes
    "A smooth sea never made a skilled mariner."
    "A ship in the harbor is safe, but that's not what ships were made for."
    "The only limitations we have are the ones we place upon ourselves."
    "To focus early pays big dividends"
  • Occupation
    Project Manager

Recent Profile Visitors

13,747 profile views
  1. The economics of cruising are as fascinating as they are counterintuitive. A few weeks ago, John Delaney, president of Seattle-based Windstar Cruises, stood on a scaffold at a historic shipyard in Palermo, Italy, and took a blowtorch to the Star Breeze, a 30-year-old, 212-passenger motor yacht. With sparks flying, and shipyard workers and invited guests cheering him on, Delany made the final vertical cut to chop Star Breeze in half. But he was hardly destroying the small ship—he was doing just the opposite. In a process called “stretching,” the Star Breeze is getting pulled apart to make room for a new, 84-foot, 1,250-ton prefab midsection addition. Think of it like unsnapping (or unwelding) two Legos and putting another block in between. But with a boat. After four months of surgery, the all-suite Star Breeze will be bigger, more luxurious, and more profitable. When she debuts again in February, she’ll have 50 new suites to house 100 additional guests, a 50% increase in passenger capacity, and command higher rates for her shiny new cabins. Delaney says it should add at least 20 years to the ship’s life span. Stretching, it turns out, is so good for Windstar’s bottom line that the company will similarly expand two more ships by the end of 2020, spending a total $250 million to increase its overall capacity by 24%. The Big Idea Stretching cruise ships is hardly a new idea. Teijo Niemela, editor of CruiseBusiness.com, says the concept was borrowed from Scandinavian ferries that were sliced to add cargo space. He sailed on his first stretched ferry in Finland in 1972. It was only six years later that Royal Caribbean added an 85-foot block to first expand a ship, the Song of Norway, starting a slow but steady industry trend. The defunct Royal Viking Line stretched ships in the 1980s; Norwegian Cruise Line added sections to three ships in the 1990s. More recently, MSC Cruises lengthened four ships and has announced plans to slice a fifth. The $143 million project, scheduled for 2021, will add 75,000 square feet to the MSC Magnifica, comprising 215 new staterooms (most of them in the popular balcony category), two restaurants, and a water park, as well as technology that’s more environmentally friendly. Last year in Palermo, ultraluxury line Silversea added a 49-foot midsection to its Silver Spirit at a cost of $70 million, increasing the ship’s capacity from 540 to 608 passengers by adding 34 suites. It took 500 workers and about 450,000 man hours to complete the stretch. “For cruise lines, it’s a quicker way to expand capacity compared to building a new cruise ship,” Niemela says. “A new cruise ship takes about 22 months or more [to build]. Add a new midsection, and it’s only a few months that the ship is out of service.” Doing the Math With estimates of about $175 million to build a 300-plus passenger vessel, stretching the older ones made more sense, Delaney says, especially when each project costs an average $80 million. There are also benefits downstream. While the guts of the ships are open, Windstar is replacing seven outdated engines with four new Wartsila engines that will meet the International Maritime Organization’s tougher emissions standards. “Not only do we get to leverage the fuel against more people, we’re putting in much more fuel-efficient, energy saving, state-of-the-art engine technology,” Delaney says. “We get the benefit of that and reduced repairs and maintenance with the new engines.” Fixed costs don’t change much when a ship is stretched. Build a new one, and you have to fully staff it; expand an old one, and it’s a matter of a few extra hires to maintain the same crew-to-guest ratio. (That, and a slightly longer shopping list to stock the kitchens.) “The flow through on the extra hundred guests, that revenue, almost 90% goes to the bottom line,” Delaney says. “It’s significant. The return on the investment was much, much higher on the stretch.” The Cutting Edge The entire stretching process happens on a dry dock where workers have access to all sides of a ship—including the bottom—and can manually torch through structural walls with ease. There’s no room for error when your 13,000-ton yacht needs to (literally) stay afloat. Six such stretchings, including those by Windstar, Silversea, and MSC Cruises, plus another two for ferries, have taken place over the last five years at the Palermo yard of Italian master shipbuilder Fincantieri SpA. Once all the guts of a ship are removed, including pipes and cabling, engineers pull the front half of the ship forward on giant blocks, then use self-propelled platforms on wheels to maneuver a prefabricated middle section into place before welding it all back together. Unlike Frankenstein, Star Breeze will bear no visible scars when it leaves the shipyard early next year. As with Silversea’s expansion of the Silver Spirit, which added, among other things, a seafood and steak restaurant, pizza parlor, outdoor aerobics studio, and additional sunny places for lounging, Star Breeze will also get upgrades along the way. “When those ships were built [in the 1980s], things like a big pool, a really nice spa, a great gym weren’t as important,” Delaney says. Today, he notes, they’re expected. Star Breeze’s new pool is five times larger, and the fitness center now has a yoga studio. Other upgrades include a 1,374-square-foot, three-bedroom Grand Owner’s Suite and a handful of restaurants. Plus, the ship’s profile gets longer, sleeker, and prettier. “It’s no longer short and stubby like a hatchback,” he laughs. By lengthening its ships, Windstar will add 150 suites that will go for an average $450 to $550 per person per night. With those 300 additional passengers, the six-ship line, owned by Denver billionaire Philip Anschutz’ Anschutz Corp., could add more than $49.2 million in annual revenue. By Fran Golden, Bloomberg Re-posted on CruiseCrazies.com - Cruise News, Articles, Forums, Packing List, Ship Tracker, and more For more cruise news and articles go to https://www.cruisecrazies.com View full article
  2. The economics of cruising are as fascinating as they are counterintuitive. A few weeks ago, John Delaney, president of Seattle-based Windstar Cruises, stood on a scaffold at a historic shipyard in Palermo, Italy, and took a blowtorch to the Star Breeze, a 30-year-old, 212-passenger motor yacht. With sparks flying, and shipyard workers and invited guests cheering him on, Delany made the final vertical cut to chop Star Breeze in half. But he was hardly destroying the small ship—he was doing just the opposite. In a process called “stretching,” the Star Breeze is getting pulled apart to make room for a new, 84-foot, 1,250-ton prefab midsection addition. Think of it like unsnapping (or unwelding) two Legos and putting another block in between. But with a boat. After four months of surgery, the all-suite Star Breeze will be bigger, more luxurious, and more profitable. When she debuts again in February, she’ll have 50 new suites to house 100 additional guests, a 50% increase in passenger capacity, and command higher rates for her shiny new cabins. Delaney says it should add at least 20 years to the ship’s life span. Stretching, it turns out, is so good for Windstar’s bottom line that the company will similarly expand two more ships by the end of 2020, spending a total $250 million to increase its overall capacity by 24%. The Big Idea Stretching cruise ships is hardly a new idea. Teijo Niemela, editor of CruiseBusiness.com, says the concept was borrowed from Scandinavian ferries that were sliced to add cargo space. He sailed on his first stretched ferry in Finland in 1972. It was only six years later that Royal Caribbean added an 85-foot block to first expand a ship, the Song of Norway, starting a slow but steady industry trend. The defunct Royal Viking Line stretched ships in the 1980s; Norwegian Cruise Line added sections to three ships in the 1990s. More recently, MSC Cruises lengthened four ships and has announced plans to slice a fifth. The $143 million project, scheduled for 2021, will add 75,000 square feet to the MSC Magnifica, comprising 215 new staterooms (most of them in the popular balcony category), two restaurants, and a water park, as well as technology that’s more environmentally friendly. Last year in Palermo, ultraluxury line Silversea added a 49-foot midsection to its Silver Spirit at a cost of $70 million, increasing the ship’s capacity from 540 to 608 passengers by adding 34 suites. It took 500 workers and about 450,000 man hours to complete the stretch. “For cruise lines, it’s a quicker way to expand capacity compared to building a new cruise ship,” Niemela says. “A new cruise ship takes about 22 months or more [to build]. Add a new midsection, and it’s only a few months that the ship is out of service.” Doing the Math With estimates of about $175 million to build a 300-plus passenger vessel, stretching the older ones made more sense, Delaney says, especially when each project costs an average $80 million. There are also benefits downstream. While the guts of the ships are open, Windstar is replacing seven outdated engines with four new Wartsila engines that will meet the International Maritime Organization’s tougher emissions standards. “Not only do we get to leverage the fuel against more people, we’re putting in much more fuel-efficient, energy saving, state-of-the-art engine technology,” Delaney says. “We get the benefit of that and reduced repairs and maintenance with the new engines.” Fixed costs don’t change much when a ship is stretched. Build a new one, and you have to fully staff it; expand an old one, and it’s a matter of a few extra hires to maintain the same crew-to-guest ratio. (That, and a slightly longer shopping list to stock the kitchens.) “The flow through on the extra hundred guests, that revenue, almost 90% goes to the bottom line,” Delaney says. “It’s significant. The return on the investment was much, much higher on the stretch.” The Cutting Edge The entire stretching process happens on a dry dock where workers have access to all sides of a ship—including the bottom—and can manually torch through structural walls with ease. There’s no room for error when your 13,000-ton yacht needs to (literally) stay afloat. Six such stretchings, including those by Windstar, Silversea, and MSC Cruises, plus another two for ferries, have taken place over the last five years at the Palermo yard of Italian master shipbuilder Fincantieri SpA. Once all the guts of a ship are removed, including pipes and cabling, engineers pull the front half of the ship forward on giant blocks, then use self-propelled platforms on wheels to maneuver a prefabricated middle section into place before welding it all back together. Unlike Frankenstein, Star Breeze will bear no visible scars when it leaves the shipyard early next year. As with Silversea’s expansion of the Silver Spirit, which added, among other things, a seafood and steak restaurant, pizza parlor, outdoor aerobics studio, and additional sunny places for lounging, Star Breeze will also get upgrades along the way. “When those ships were built [in the 1980s], things like a big pool, a really nice spa, a great gym weren’t as important,” Delaney says. Today, he notes, they’re expected. Star Breeze’s new pool is five times larger, and the fitness center now has a yoga studio. Other upgrades include a 1,374-square-foot, three-bedroom Grand Owner’s Suite and a handful of restaurants. Plus, the ship’s profile gets longer, sleeker, and prettier. “It’s no longer short and stubby like a hatchback,” he laughs. By lengthening its ships, Windstar will add 150 suites that will go for an average $450 to $550 per person per night. With those 300 additional passengers, the six-ship line, owned by Denver billionaire Philip Anschutz’ Anschutz Corp., could add more than $49.2 million in annual revenue. By Fran Golden, Bloomberg Re-posted on CruiseCrazies.com - Cruise News, Articles, Forums, Packing List, Ship Tracker, and more For more cruise news and articles go to https://www.cruisecrazies.com
  3. Is the era of ever-bigger cruise ships finally coming to an end? It is for at least one of the world’s biggest big-ship cruise operators, Norwegian Cruise Line. The Miami-based company just unveiled its largest ship ever, the 169,116-ton Norwegian Encore. But it’s the last hurrah for the line in the Big Ship Wars, at least for now. Norwegian has no new vessels on order in the size range of Norwegian Encore, which ranks among the top 10 biggest passenger ships ever built. Instead, the 17-ship cruise operator is about to go smaller with its next vessels. Norwegian has ordered six new ships for delivery between 2022 and 2027 that will measure 140,000 tons — about 17% less bulky than Norwegian Encore. It’s a major shift for a line that has been hitting the supersize button on its new ships since 2010, when it unveiled the 155,873-ton Norwegian Epic — at the time, the world’s sixth-largest cruise ship. But it’s the right move at this point in Norwegian’s expansion, says incoming president and CEO Harry Sommer. “Bigger isn’t necessarily better,” Sommer told me during an exclusive interview on board Norwegian Encore in advance of its inaugural voyage out of Miami. While mega-size ships like Norwegian Encore are hugely popular with vacationers and have great economies of scale, a line like Norwegian needs a range of ship sizes in its fleet, said Sommer. Sommer ticks off several reasons, starting with the fact that the biggest mega-ships are restricted in where they can operate due to limitations in port infrastructure. “We think about where this ship can actually go, and (the options are) not as varied as we would like,” said Sommer, who is taking the helm of Norwegian from current president and CEO Andy Stuart at the end of the month. “If I had 17 ships this size, we could not run the itineraries that we run today.” Sommer cites Tampa, Florida and Sydney, Australia, as two places where the height of bridges limits the size of arrival vessels. Other factors that cruise lines must consider when contemplating bigger ships include the depth of the water and length of the piers at key ports as well as the size of turning basins (the space allocated at a port for ships to maneuver.) As ships get longer and sit deeper in the water, the number of off-limits ports increases. Another factor driving Norwegian’s interest in smaller ships is that not every destination is eager to see the world’s biggest ships arriving. Sommer mentions Venice, Italy, as a place where big ships and the overtourism associated with them is a concern. “Some [destinations] are really excited about a 2,000- or 3,000-passenger ship [arriving], and they’re a little less excited about a 4,000-passenger ship,” he said. “We’re really sensitive to it.” A third factor behind Norwegian’s interest in smaller ships is that there’s demand from vacationers. Some people just like smaller ships better. Sommer says it’s no different than in the airline business, where you get devotees of giant A380s and other people who prefer a smaller A350. In the cruise business, like any other business, it’s smart to have something for everyone. The new Norwegian ships on order are being designed to carry about 3,300 passengers at double occupancy. As Sommer points out, that’s a size that is notably missing from Norwegian’s ship portfolio. Six of Norwegian’s 17 ships, all built before 2006, are in the 2,000-passenger range. Four more vessels built between 2005 and 2007 are in the 2,400-passenger range. Then there are the line’s last seven ships, which all are in the 4,000-passenger range. “It sort of fills a niche for us,” Sommer said. “We think having these four [ship sizes] allows us to have the maximum flexibility for our guests.” Asked about the economics of going smaller, Sommer said he didn’t see a big difference in the expected returns from a 3,300-passenger ship versus a 4,000-passenger ship. “I think you have to get below like 2,000 [passengers] for the economics to flip,” he said. That’s why, other than luxury operators, “you don’t see anyone building 1,500-passenger ships anymore.” One difference with the new series of ships as compared to Norwegian’s recently added vessels is they likely will have fewer attractions on board. “We talk about having 29 dining experiences on [Norwegian Encore]. My guess is that on [the new ships] we won’t have 29 dining experiences,” Sommer said. “But then again, there’s 700 fewer people.” The new ships will be “a little bit more intimate. But … there’s a certain group that appeals to.” With its plans to add six smaller vessels in a row, Norwegian is bucking the trend in the industry, for the most part. The big news at industry giant Carnival has been the development of a new class of vessel that, at 180,000 tons, will be around 35% bigger than the biggest ships now in the Carnival fleet. The first of the series, to be called Mardi Gras, will debut in 2020. Costa Cruises, MSC Cruises and Princess Cruises also are developing new classes of bigger ships to begin debuting in 2021, 2022 and 2023, respectively, and Celebrity Cruises just began rolling out a new class of bigger ships. One other major line, Royal Caribbean, is joining Norwegian in planning a new class of ships that are smaller than its biggest vessels. But in Royal Caribbean’s case, smaller is relative. Dubbed the Icon Class, the new Royal Caribbean ships will measure about 200,000 tons, which is less than the line’s record-breaking Oasis Class vessels, but still greater than every other passenger ship currently afloat. Will any line ever top the Oasis Class in size? Sommer doesn’t rule it out. “I am sure that, as long as there are lots of players, there will always be someone vying to have the largest cruise ship out there,” he said. For now, at least, it just won’t be Norwegian. By Gene Sloan, The Points Guy Re-posted on CruiseCrazies.com - Cruise News, Articles, Forums, Packing List, Ship Tracker, and more For more cruise news and articles go to https://www.cruisecrazies.com
  4. Is the era of ever-bigger cruise ships finally coming to an end? It is for at least one of the world’s biggest big-ship cruise operators, Norwegian Cruise Line. The Miami-based company just unveiled its largest ship ever, the 169,116-ton Norwegian Encore. But it’s the last hurrah for the line in the Big Ship Wars, at least for now. Norwegian has no new vessels on order in the size range of Norwegian Encore, which ranks among the top 10 biggest passenger ships ever built. Instead, the 17-ship cruise operator is about to go smaller with its next vessels. Norwegian has ordered six new ships for delivery between 2022 and 2027 that will measure 140,000 tons — about 17% less bulky than Norwegian Encore. It’s a major shift for a line that has been hitting the supersize button on its new ships since 2010, when it unveiled the 155,873-ton Norwegian Epic — at the time, the world’s sixth-largest cruise ship. But it’s the right move at this point in Norwegian’s expansion, says incoming president and CEO Harry Sommer. “Bigger isn’t necessarily better,” Sommer told me during an exclusive interview on board Norwegian Encore in advance of its inaugural voyage out of Miami. While mega-size ships like Norwegian Encore are hugely popular with vacationers and have great economies of scale, a line like Norwegian needs a range of ship sizes in its fleet, said Sommer. Sommer ticks off several reasons, starting with the fact that the biggest mega-ships are restricted in where they can operate due to limitations in port infrastructure. “We think about where this ship can actually go, and (the options are) not as varied as we would like,” said Sommer, who is taking the helm of Norwegian from current president and CEO Andy Stuart at the end of the month. “If I had 17 ships this size, we could not run the itineraries that we run today.” Sommer cites Tampa, Florida and Sydney, Australia, as two places where the height of bridges limits the size of arrival vessels. Other factors that cruise lines must consider when contemplating bigger ships include the depth of the water and length of the piers at key ports as well as the size of turning basins (the space allocated at a port for ships to maneuver.) As ships get longer and sit deeper in the water, the number of off-limits ports increases. Another factor driving Norwegian’s interest in smaller ships is that not every destination is eager to see the world’s biggest ships arriving. Sommer mentions Venice, Italy, as a place where big ships and the overtourism associated with them is a concern. “Some [destinations] are really excited about a 2,000- or 3,000-passenger ship [arriving], and they’re a little less excited about a 4,000-passenger ship,” he said. “We’re really sensitive to it.” A third factor behind Norwegian’s interest in smaller ships is that there’s demand from vacationers. Some people just like smaller ships better. Sommer says it’s no different than in the airline business, where you get devotees of giant A380s and other people who prefer a smaller A350. In the cruise business, like any other business, it’s smart to have something for everyone. The new Norwegian ships on order are being designed to carry about 3,300 passengers at double occupancy. As Sommer points out, that’s a size that is notably missing from Norwegian’s ship portfolio. Six of Norwegian’s 17 ships, all built before 2006, are in the 2,000-passenger range. Four more vessels built between 2005 and 2007 are in the 2,400-passenger range. Then there are the line’s last seven ships, which all are in the 4,000-passenger range. “It sort of fills a niche for us,” Sommer said. “We think having these four [ship sizes] allows us to have the maximum flexibility for our guests.” Asked about the economics of going smaller, Sommer said he didn’t see a big difference in the expected returns from a 3,300-passenger ship versus a 4,000-passenger ship. “I think you have to get below like 2,000 [passengers] for the economics to flip,” he said. That’s why, other than luxury operators, “you don’t see anyone building 1,500-passenger ships anymore.” One difference with the new series of ships as compared to Norwegian’s recently added vessels is they likely will have fewer attractions on board. “We talk about having 29 dining experiences on [Norwegian Encore]. My guess is that on [the new ships] we won’t have 29 dining experiences,” Sommer said. “But then again, there’s 700 fewer people.” The new ships will be “a little bit more intimate. But … there’s a certain group that appeals to.” With its plans to add six smaller vessels in a row, Norwegian is bucking the trend in the industry, for the most part. The big news at industry giant Carnival has been the development of a new class of vessel that, at 180,000 tons, will be around 35% bigger than the biggest ships now in the Carnival fleet. The first of the series, to be called Mardi Gras, will debut in 2020. Costa Cruises, MSC Cruises and Princess Cruises also are developing new classes of bigger ships to begin debuting in 2021, 2022 and 2023, respectively, and Celebrity Cruises just began rolling out a new class of bigger ships. One other major line, Royal Caribbean, is joining Norwegian in planning a new class of ships that are smaller than its biggest vessels. But in Royal Caribbean’s case, smaller is relative. Dubbed the Icon Class, the new Royal Caribbean ships will measure about 200,000 tons, which is less than the line’s record-breaking Oasis Class vessels, but still greater than every other passenger ship currently afloat. Will any line ever top the Oasis Class in size? Sommer doesn’t rule it out. “I am sure that, as long as there are lots of players, there will always be someone vying to have the largest cruise ship out there,” he said. For now, at least, it just won’t be Norwegian. By Gene Sloan, The Points Guy Re-posted on CruiseCrazies.com - Cruise News, Articles, Forums, Packing List, Ship Tracker, and more For more cruise news and articles go to https://www.cruisecrazies.com View full article
  5. Hey ClayCab, Welcome to CruiseCrazies! I encourage you to take a few moments to familiarize yourself with the many features and friendly faces you'll be seeing around. Some basics on getting started: View & customize your profile here: View Member Introduce yourself in our "New Member Introductions" forum Submit your first cruise post in our "Lets Talk Cruise" forum Share recent onboard experiences: Post a Cruise Review Customize your cover photo, profile and settings here The complete guide to "Getting Started" is available here. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask! See you around! ?
  6. Welcome, ClayCab!  See you around!

  7. Hey edrodcapt, Welcome to CruiseCrazies! I encourage you to take a few moments to familiarize yourself with the many features and friendly faces you'll be seeing around. Some basics on getting started: View & customize your profile here: View Member Introduce yourself in our "New Member Introductions" forum Submit your first cruise post in our "Lets Talk Cruise" forum Share recent onboard experiences: Post a Cruise Review Customize your cover photo, profile and settings here The complete guide to "Getting Started" is available here. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask! See you around! ?
  8. Welcome, edrodcapt!  See you around!

  9. Hey Lkingsmtn, Welcome to CruiseCrazies! I encourage you to take a few moments to familiarize yourself with the many features and friendly faces you'll be seeing around. Some basics on getting started: View & customize your profile here: View Member Introduce yourself in our "New Member Introductions" forum Submit your first cruise post in our "Lets Talk Cruise" forum Share recent onboard experiences: Post a Cruise Review Customize your cover photo, profile and settings here The complete guide to "Getting Started" is available here. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask! See you around! ?
  10. Welcome, Lkingsmtn!  See you around!

  11. Hey Shanecramer, Welcome to CruiseCrazies! I encourage you to take a few moments to familiarize yourself with the many features and friendly faces you'll be seeing around. Some basics on getting started: View & customize your profile here: View Member Introduce yourself in our "New Member Introductions" forum Submit your first cruise post in our "Lets Talk Cruise" forum Share recent onboard experiences: Post a Cruise Review Customize your cover photo, profile and settings here The complete guide to "Getting Started" is available here. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask! See you around! ?
  12. Welcome, Shanecramer!  See you around!

  13. Hey SlyIndieGirl, Welcome to CruiseCrazies! I encourage you to take a few moments to familiarize yourself with the many features and friendly faces you'll be seeing around. Some basics on getting started: View & customize your profile here: View Member Introduce yourself in our "New Member Introductions" forum Submit your first cruise post in our "Lets Talk Cruise" forum Share recent onboard experiences: Post a Cruise Review Customize your cover photo, profile and settings here The complete guide to "Getting Started" is available here. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask! See you around! ?
  14. Hey TexCpl3443, Welcome to CruiseCrazies! I encourage you to take a few moments to familiarize yourself with the many features and friendly faces you'll be seeing around. Some basics on getting started: View & customize your profile here: View Member Introduce yourself in our "New Member Introductions" forum Submit your first cruise post in our "Lets Talk Cruise" forum Share recent onboard experiences: Post a Cruise Review Customize your cover photo, profile and settings here The complete guide to "Getting Started" is available here. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask! See you around! ?
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